2017 Flood Alternatives | The Lake Is Up But Oklahoma Has A Lot To Offer

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WHAT TO DO FOR SUMMER FUN WHILE ALL THE LAKES ARE FLOODED

The 2017 Flood has left many of Oklahoma’s lakes flood­ed and fam­i­lies won­der­ing what to do for fun sum­mer activ­i­ties. For­tu­nate­ly, our state boasts a wealth of excit­ing activ­i­ties. That will make it eas­i­er for you to find alter­na­tive sum­mer fun. Each of the options below will give you a unique taste of every­thing Okla­homa has in store. Who knows, as the flood waters recede you might decide to make them a reg­u­lar part of your vaca­tion fun.

1. GO BIRD WATCHING AT BLACK MESA STATE PARK

Black Mesa State Park and Nature Pre­serve is a great place to head to if the 2017 flood dis­rupt­ed your orig­i­nal plans. Okla­homa is in the path of many migra­to­ry bird species, mak­ing this pre­serve a top attrac­tion to keep under con­sid­er­a­tion. Your kids will enjoy this unique chance to go on an out­door adven­ture. They will eas­i­ly imag­ine them­selves back in the old days when Native Amer­i­can tribes and cow­boys roamed the area. Many of the birds that pass through this area are species abun­dant in the Rock­ies. This giv­ing you a unique chance to spot them with­out leav­ing the state. Some of the most pop­u­lar winged vis­i­tors include Bald Eagles, Bur­row­ing Owls, Less­er Prairie Chick­ens and Moun­tain Blue­birds. Be sure to bring your cam­era, because the sur­round­ings pro­vide a per­fect back­drop for some pic­tures that you’ll trea­sure.

2. ATTEND THE RED EARTH FESTIVAL IN OKLAHOMA CITY (JUNE 9–11)

If bird watch­ing isn’t your thing then this sum­mer holds many alter­na­tive 2017 flood activ­i­ties. One such as Red Earth Fes­ti­val in OKC. This annu­al fes­ti­val brings trib­al cul­ture and her­itage to life before your eyes. Over 1000 dancers and artists rep­re­sent­ing over 100 tribes. The fes­ti­val offers fun for art and craft enthu­si­asts. Offer­ing the chance to shop for authen­tic crafts made by gen­uine trib­al arti­sans. All ages will enjoy the dances that fea­ture col­or­ful cos­tumes and it’s always fun to see who will win the com­pe­ti­tions. Atten­dees will have a whole new appre­ci­a­tion for Native cul­ture and local his­to­ry. There are few expe­ri­ences that come close to liv­ing Native Amer­i­can cul­ture first-hand.

You bet­ter gath­er the gang up quick. This one is only June 9th-11th click here for a map and more infor­ma­tion.*

3. VISIT WITH THE MUSTANGS AT MOWDY RANCH

When sum­mers comin’ and you got the lake on your mind. Mowdy Wild Mus­tang Ranch might be just the place to get that over­filled lake off your mind. If you’re look­ing for a great taste of the Old West, there are few things that pro­vide this expe­ri­ence bet­ter than vis­it­ing with wild mus­tangs. When you’re among wild hors­es, it is very easy to imag­ine Okla­homa as it must have been before the state was set­tled. The 4,000-acre prop­er­ty is home to over 150 wild hors­es. They also have a pop­u­la­tion of black­buck ante­lope and fal­low deer. Guid­ed tours give you the best access to these beau­ti­ful ani­mals, also ensur­ing that you have plen­ty of chances to take pic­tures for last­ing mem­o­ries. These tours last an hour, a great length for vis­i­tors with kids. Equine enthu­si­asts of all ages will appre­ci­ate the efforts to save these beau­ti­ful sym­bols of Oklahoma’s her­itage.

4. TAKE A ROAD TRIP ALONG ROUTE 66

Even if Oklahoma’s lakes are out of the equa­tion for sum­mer fun, there are still plen­ty of activ­i­ties through­out the state that will more than make up for them. The part of Route 66 that runs through Okla­homa offers some attrac­tions that high­light the state’s unique char­ac­ter and pro­vide a lot of fun for all ages. Some of the high­lights that you’ll find along the high­way include the Route 66 Vin­tage Iron Motor­cy­cle Muse­um, the Will Rogers Memo­r­i­al Muse­um, the Route 66 Muse­um and Totem Pole Park. No mat­ter how long the length of your vaca­tion, you’ll find a lot of fas­ci­nat­ing things to do along this route.

5. DO SOME EXPLORING IN THE ALABASTER CAVERNS STATE PARK

While the 2017 flood might have the lake waters up and the kids feel­ing down (about not get­ting to swim that is). These cav­erns fea­ture alabaster, which is a rare type of gyp­sum. Alabaster cre­ates some tru­ly stun­ning for­ma­tions. The cave at this park is the largest of its kind that is open to the pub­lic, ensur­ing an amaz­ing time for every­one that takes one of the tours. All of these tours are guid­ed, and you’ll appre­ci­ate the unique insights that your guide offers. The total tour spans 3/4 of a mile and takes around 45 min­utes. A lot of bats that call the cav­ern home, and see­ing them take flight at dusk is well worth your time. Should you enjoy the idea of camp­ing, tent and RVsites are avail­able, along with pic­nic and grilling areas ide­al for enjoy­ing an evening under the stars.

Spencer Heckathorn

Co-Founder, Author

Spencer 

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